Country Programs

 

I Don’t Always Feel Like a Teacher

Posted by WTTech in China

“I’ve talked to people who have been teaching for decades and they’ve told me they don’t always feel like a teacher.” This week get a taste of what it’s like to be a volunteer teacher in China as we interview Tracey Sullivan, a current teacher in Nanyue, Hunan Province in China. There she lives and teaches some classes of more than 60 students with her husband. She’s learned to motivate while instructing and not to take anything personally, read on to get the latest from one of our most popular WorldTeach programs. Volunteer Spotlight, January 2016 Meet Tracey Sullivan, Current Volunteer in China In which WorldTeach country program are you currently serving? We (my husband and I) are working in China,…

4 Lessons I Learned the Hard Way

Posted by WTTech in Namibia

Interested in teaching in Namibia for a summer? Consider applying to the WorldTeach Namibia program. But remember… you still have plenty to learn as well as teach, and learning from others is totally OK. Consider the wise words of Martha Caudill before you go! — For my survival, it was required of me to learn these things. I didn’t find this out until after I had learned them. And I learned them in the hardest way possible. Through experience. Trial and error. Many, many errors. But these lessons will go with me for the rest of my life. People are people and let them be. Some are good, some are bad. Some are respectable, some are disgusting. Some will surprise…

“It’s a good thing that smiles and hugs are universally understood.”

Posted by WTTech in South Africa

Making friends abroad is actually easier than it may seem. And when you volunteer to teach via WorldTeach you’re likely to make more friends than you know how to handle. Imagine you’re a small child in a village that doesn’t receive many foreigners. The foreigners that bend down to your height, look you in the eye, and teach you how to read will likely be your favorite. Let Catherine Celeste Helm take you on a journey via the local language and local love.  — We are all so happy to make new friends. The downside is that, unlike everyone else here, we only speak one language. Most people here speak a minimum of two languages, with working knowledge of a…

“I’m always going to want to do more, but for now this is a start.”

Posted by WTTech in South Africa

Volunteering to teach abroad is a wholehearted experience. You can’t give a partial effort and you can’t give only a part of yourself. Volunteers that truly immersive themselves in these experiences via WorldTeach find that it’s REALLY hard to let go of what they can’t control. They give SO much, and in the end, they still have to go home. Take this ride with Britney Jarvis and hold on tight. You might not want to let go! — So the past couple of days here in South Africa have been incredibly emotional days for all of us. We have experienced some extreme highs and extreme lows. On Monday we went back to Masiphumelele in the afternoon and met with the…

“Sometimes you just never know…”

Posted by WTTech in Nepal

Sometimes it’s difficult to understand the kind of impact that you’re having when you’re so close to the action. The things that stand out most are the kids’ faces, the fun that you had sharing life lessons, and the scenery, but when teachers get an opportunity to look back – the images of the past are much more vivid. Let Holly take you on a journey through her WorldTeach Nepal experience from the summer of 2014. — Jumping right into teaching English as a second language in a foreign country to brand new students with brand new co-teachers in very bare classrooms with very limited resources would be a severe understatement if I called it a challenge. But when the…

Your grandmother is Chinese, I said to myself. You should have known better.

Posted by WTTech in China

Quincy Carroll is one of those rare WorldTeach volunteers that has stayed connected with us both regularly and in spirit. He remains active in our social media feeds, participates in our alumni media contests, and has even published a novel that he claims is loosely based on his experience in Hunan, China via WorldTeach. As an honest and articulate alumni with plenty of stories to tell, we asked him to write for us. WorldTeach presents, Quincy in rare form. — One of the primary reasons I decided to move to China was to improve my Chinese. I had devoted a lot of time and energy toward studying the language in school, so it felt like the hours would have been wasted…

Time Travel with Elizabeth Paiva

Posted by WTTech in Ecuador

Have you ever read something so rich that you forget who or where you are? As someone who reads through blogs almost daily, it never ceases to amaze me how much writing styles differ. As we approach the Thanksgiving holiday our memory likely triggers textured thoughts of warm crinkling leaves and heavy coats shielding bellies filled with fall delights, but if we head further south than Mexico to a country aptly called Ecuador, the fall can bring out even more imagery and emotion, even the answers to some mysteries. You can thank Elizabeth Paiva for this one. Check out more of her incredible writings at 20somethingwanderings.wordpress.com! — Sometimes I forget I’m in Ecuador. Most days are pretty standard. I eat oatmeal for breakfast,…

“All of these things made me realize how big of a difference I can make.”

Posted by WTTech in Chile

When we say WorldTeach is an adventure, we mean it. Our volunteers experience challenges en route, in-country, in class, in town, out of town, and on nearly every beaten and unbeaten path there is to explore. What Americans and native English speakers tend to find normal is often left by the wayside as they acclimate, but one thing is for sure, the more that you can laugh at your mistakes and learn from them, the better off you’ll be in the long run. Check out how Jordan Gristock dealt with the initial challenges of the WorldTeach Chile program in 2012. —  One week of teaching down! Monday was extremely rough at the Liceo (high school). I arrived to the school…

Spirit Week in American Samoa

Posted by WTTech in American Samoa

For WorldTeach volunteers, school spirit is a source of inspiration. It manifests differently at every location, but no experience is quite the same without. Some gather over special foods, some have special ceremonies, and some simply dress up to show out. In American Samoa, it’s not uncommon to have a spirit week to celebrate the diversity of characters in the community. Let Danielle Randolph share with you how the spirit of Halloween takes places in her WorldTeach destination. If you’d like to read more about her experience, follow the link to her blog here – http://bit.ly/1NpCjGN. — Since my school doesn’t have any sports teams they tend to find to have a spirit week anyway. Halloween I guess is a perfect time…

“What an introduction to the world of teaching.”

Posted by WTTech in Chile

Have you ever heard that making a decision is just the beginning? Deciding to embark on a WorldTeach adventure is just the beginning and moreover just the tip of the iceberg. As you settle in and begin to peel back the layers on what you have decided to do, the adventure becomes as much about self-discovery as it does about teaching. The country will embrace you. The kids will admire you. The parents will appreciate you. But more than anything you’ll have to embrace, admire, and appreciate yourself to finish a WorldTeach adventure. Allow David Hanna to share with you his honest take on settling into the world of teaching in Chile. — I feel like I am connected to…