Country Programs

 

Holidays Away From Home

Posted by Heather Tang in China

Even though many WorldTeach volunteers spend their holiday season away from their home and families, they certainly do not spend it alone. Alyssa, a WorldTeach China volunteer, recounts her non-traditional Thanksgiving surrounded by her new friends and colleagues.       Winter has finally arrived here in China, but without the typical holiday festiveness in the air. Holidays are the hardest time while living abroad and you need to make sure you find ways to make it your own. As I sit here, freezing my little buns off because China has yet to discover central heat or insulation, and because winter in Changsha consists of rain, lots of it and a constant temp between 39-45 degrees F, I realize I…

College Prep in Pohnpei

Posted by Heather Tang in Micronesia

While your time as a WorldTeach volunteer may be limited, your impact is certainly not. Volunteers have an abundance of opportunities to get involved in the larger community and make long lasting impacts. Whitney, a WorldTeach Micronesia volunteer, discusses the creation of a college preparation program for her students. Along with one of my Peace Corps friends, Amber, I’m starting a college prep program for senior students who are interested in attending college in the United States next year. Students applied to the program with a 5 paragraph essay, based on the following questions: Why do you deserve to attend college in the US? What makes you different from other Pohnpeians your age? What do you see yourself doing in…

Setting. Students. Sweat. Shouts. Surprises.

Posted by Heather Tang in Colombia

Many things will define your experience teaching abroad. Bryanna, a WorldTeach Colombia volunteer, elucidates that five things that have defined her experience so far. The 5 S’s of Santa Ana: A Look at Living and Teaching on Isla Barú: Setting. Students. Sweat. Shouts. Surprises.   These five things have not only defined my experience teaching English and living in Colombia but also help explain my experiences here—what I have enjoyed, struggled with, and learned from life here. (Plus, who doesn’t like blog posts defined by alliteration?)     Setting   First, let me set the scene. Palm and jacaranda trees blowing in a hot breeze. Green bushes grow densely thanks to the rainy season where months before there was only…

The State of Education in Chile

Posted by Heather Tang in Chile

Monica, a WorldTeach Chile volunteer, offers some insights on the state of education in Chile and the similarities and differences to the US.   During the time I have been here, Chile’s educational system has been in a state of change. Passionate students, teachers, and citizens have taken to the streets to protest the quality and cost of education in Chile, advocating for educational reform; for better quality and free public education.     The public education available to Chilean students (like the municipal schools that I taught in) is mediocre at best. The public schools are underfunded, under-resourced, and poorly managed. Though it is considered one of South America’s most stable and prosperous nations, Chile is a country with…

There Are Times…

Posted by Heather Tang in Marshall Islands

Throughout your term of service, you are bound to experience various emotions about your job, your location, your community and more. Justin, a WorldTeach Marshall Islands volunteer, writes about his ups and downs, how they seem to balance each other out and how, regardless of the emotion involved, everything he is experiencing has value.       There are times when I wonder what I’m doing here.   There are times when my 6th grade class can’t seem to stop talking, and no amount of positive or negative reinforcement changes this. There are times when I feel like my students aren’t making any progress. There are times when I stare at the textbooks all afternoon trying to figure out how…

Why Does Education Matter?

Posted by Heather Tang in Micronesia

How do teachers cope with an occasional lack of motivation in their students? How should a volunteer think about their job as a teacher if an education isn’t necessarily required to succeed? Maureen, a WorldTeach Micronesia volunteer, grapples with these questions while teaching at the College of Micronesia and realizes that regardless of a student’s future path, education matters.     I work at the College of Micronesia – Pohnpei State Campus teaching 77 little rascals either Intermediate Algebra, Elementary Algebra, or Health Science. And clearly, by “little rascals” I mean adults aged 17-40.   COM is an interesting place. Although it has “college” in the title, it is not really comparable to college either at home in Canada or…

Teaching Maths and Sciences

Posted by Heather Tang in Guyana

While many WorldTeach volunteers are assigned to teach English, some countries request volunteers to teach science and math courses. With limited resources in many schools this may seem like a formidable endeavor, but our creative and dedicated WorldTeach volunteers have proven that they are able to tackle this challenge head on. Corin, Suzanne and Sarah, three WorldTeach Guyana volunteers, talk about making math and science more accessible to their students.     Corin’s Clever Solution to Teaching Terms There is a class that I teach three separate classes to, biology, chemistry and human and social biology. As I teach I often break down scientific words to their origin so that the students can see where the definition is coming from….

Rain, Rain, Go or Stay

Posted by Heather Tang in Tanzania

Are you wondering what fall weather will bring and how to prepare appropriately where you’re living? Matt, a Tanzania WorldTeach volunteer, recounts his experiences with “rainy season” in Tanzania, and the fascinating beauty, power and universality of nature. Right now in Tanzania, we are in the midst of the rainy season of the year.   At times it can be a fascinating display of nature’s power that I never really experienced back in the US. I can see why it’s called the “rainy season”, since it tends to rain just about every day. However, it doesn’t rain hard every day. Some days there is just a brief shower and other days it will rain so hard that it can wake…

Pre and Post Teaching

Posted by Heather Tang in Tanzania

Working in a school in another country will certainly make you to think about your preconceived notions of the education system, and will sometimes require you to put them aside. Schools in all of the countries WorldTeach partners with vary a great deal and flexibility will be one of your keys for success. When you open your mind to new ways of looking at learning and teaching, you will find that you can make a real impression on your students that you will both be able to feel and see.   Megan, a WorldTeach Tanzania volunteer, shares her first classroom experience in Tanzania followed by one of her last days and some reflections on her experience.   From October 6,…

Weekends: Thai-Style

Posted by Heather Tang in Thailand

While our volunteers spend most of their time in the classroom, there are plenty of oppertunities on the weekends to relax and explore the area. Below, current Thailand volunteer Kerry Tanney describes a trip to see some local attractions, including a dried-up waterfall and a “sleeping” volcano.   “Kerry, what are you doing on Saturday and Sunday?” “Um … I’m not sure … maybe go to Nakhon Phanom?” “Do you want to go to a waterfall?” “Ok, sure, what day? What time?” “Sunday … I think early morning.”   This is a typical conversation between Sumet and I over lunch, either on a Tuesday or a Friday, and exchanged in a mix of Thai and English, in I am being…