Country Programs

 

A Love Story to the RMI

Posted by Nolan Sutker in Marshall Islands, News & Highlights

A Love Song to the RMI I hum softly as you drift off in my arms. I watch as Mary breaks off from her twittering friends and wanders through the party in our direction. She doesn’t bother to make eye contact when she speaks; we gaze off at the same middle-distance, unmindful of the festivities. That is your baby? No. Whose baby? He is Likto’s baby. There is a pause in the conversation while Mary mulls over this apparently new information and I wonder how anything is ever news on this little island. You gurgle softly. Your mother is Wijlang? Yes. Likto mother is Wijlang. Yes. Likto is your sister. That is your baby. The tone of finality in Mary’s…

Toe Tasi (Just One More)

Posted by Nolan Sutker in American Samoa, News & Highlights, Uncategorized

Siva Siva Mai I‘m standing over the stove when I hear the music start to play. The bass carrying over the village kicks starts my rusty math skills; if I finish the pasta and sauce that will take 15 minutes, and its 7:15 right now, but if I go right now and they are setting up then I’ll wait around for 45 minutes, but if it’s starting right now and I don’t go until 8, I’ll probably miss half. I go to the window looking for any signs of life, or lack of life, in my neighbor’s house. I decide to finish cooking the pasta, but not to make the sauce; if I’m early than I can offer to help,…

Breaking Stereotypes

Posted by Nolan Sutker in Marshall Islands, News & Highlights

Submitted by WorldTeach Volunteer Teacher, Lauren Hostovsky Albert’s Story  As some of you might already know, two-thirds of the people in the Marshall Islands live on less than $1 a day. Job opportunities in Ebeye are limited due to overpopulation on this tiny island. This has made it more difficult for people with disabilities to get a job, however Albert is breaking the stereotype. It’s been two months already since he got a part time job at Triple J (supermarket) in Ebeye. As far as I know, he is the first Deaf man to have a job in Ebeye. Albert has shown everyone that being deaf doesn’t stop him from working and making a living. I would like to give…

Bangladesu: Encountering Japan Anew in South Asia

Posted by Nolan Sutker in Bangladesh, News & Highlights

By WorldTeach Bangladesh Volunteer Mark Flanigan As a JET alumnus, I look back fondly on the four years I spent living and teaching in Nagasaki Prefecture. Serving on JET was, quite literally, one of those “life-changing” experiences, as it confirmed my career path in the direction of public service and global education. In the 15 years or so since my time in Nagasaki, I have been lucky to have had international roles in the U.S. government, in higher education, and at a private, Japan-focused non-profit foundation. I was even fortunate enough to return to Japan a second time, to earn my MA in Peace Studies in 2012 through the Rotary Peace Center at International Christian University (ICU) in Tokyo. Later, I…

Weeding the Seeds of Cultural Understanding

Posted by Nolan Sutker in American Samoa, News & Highlights

By WorldTeach American Samoa Volunteer Anna Bauder There are only 3 “rules” in my classroom: Respect Yourself, Respect Others, and Respect your Environment. These are the only 3 rules in my classroom because those are the main 3 rules of life and encompass all other rules. Try your hardest = Respect Yourself Don’t curse = Respect Others (or yourself) Don’t litter = Respect your Environment.   However, Environment extends past location (Manu’a High School, Faleasao, Ta’u, Manu’a, American Samoa, Pacific Ocean, Southwestern hemisphere); it goes beyond weather (so warm and SO humid); it covers more than geography (perpetual ocean soundtrack with rugged backdrop). Environment travels into the expansive realm of culture and connecting with people. After living in a different…

Teaching and Learning

Posted by Nolan Sutker in Colombia, News & Highlights

By WorldTeach Colombia Volunteer Martina Boyter   I suppose it’s time I share a bit about a major part of my day-to-day and the reason I’m here… teaching! I teach English at Institución Educativa Antonia Santos, a public colegio (high school). Antonia Santos also has a primary school, but I only work with the upper grades, sixth through eleventh. My heaviest focus is on ninth and tenth grade, but I get to work with other grades as well, either in class or through my English club! It’s common in Colombia for schools to have two jornadas, or schedules, per day. A solution to overcrowding. What does a two-jornada school look like? The mornings and afternoons are completely separate – same school,…

Cold Cat

Posted by Nolan Sutker in American Samoa, News & Highlights

By WorldTeach American Samoa Volunteer Christiana Galeai The first couple of months were horrendous, the most challenging job yet. Being a full time college student with two part time jobs was looking like chocolate cake compared to seventh grade. It was horrible. Not because of the place, culture, or students. I love my students, I love my school, and I love American Samoa. The elementary I am assigned to sits by soothing waves of the Pacific. Hues of blues and green lavish the eyes with inspiration that travel from deep within the soul to far beyond the horizon. Pulling into the gravel parking lot, I enter an old, new world. A thick wooden door chipped with red paint hides a…

A Part of Something Greater

Posted by Nolan Sutker in Ecuador, News & Highlights

By Worldteach Ecuador volunteer Lindsay Mahaney, 2016 Arguably the best place to get a doughnut in Quito is a little bakery called Skull Doughnuts. The very first time I went was during my first week in Ecuador. You’re met with the scent of fresh pastries when you walk through the door. There’s a counter to you’re right with a wall of chocolate, sprinkled, creamed and glazed treats behind it. A sweet, tiny woman greets you with a pleasant smile and friendly chatter, as you get to survey the cornucopia of deep fried doughy goodness. After careful consideration, and a lot of gesturing, I managed to convey my desire for a doughnut with chocolate frosting on this first occasion at Skull. Some things…

Halfway There

Posted by Nolan Sutker in American Samoa, News & Highlights

By WorldTeach American Samoa volunteer Marcela Trocha, 2016 When I arrived in American Samoa on August 7th, 2016, I had no expectations for my experience as a high school science teacher at Tafuna High School or as a resident of the new country, and I didn’t comprehend how quickly the time would pass. The halfway mark of my time here has officially come and gone, and time is speeding up more than ever. The things I’ve learned in the past 5 months have been invaluable. I have developed as a leader, both in the classroom and outside of the classroom. I have grown to adapt to foreign conditions more than ever before. I have studied an unfamiliar culture and analyzed…

We are Tied to the Ocean

Posted by Nolan Sutker in Micronesia, News & Highlights

By WorldTeach Micronesia volunteer Monica Krebs, 2015 When I signed up to be a WorldTeach volunteer on the tiny island of Weno in Chuuk, Micronesia, I knew I was going to be spending ten months living and teaching in a very isolated region of the globe. But it wasn’t until I watched the small green islands materialize out of the endless blue we’d been flying through for hours that I began to realize just what it meant to be moving to a place that, when zoomed out in Google Maps, appears to be just ocean. Home to the international airport, the state hospital, and two dive resorts, Weno is Chuuk’s most developed island. Even so, life there is much quieter…