WorldTeach

 

“All of these things made me realize how big of a difference I can make.”

Posted by WTTech in Chile

When we say WorldTeach is an adventure, we mean it. Our volunteers experience challenges en route, in-country, in class, in town, out of town, and on nearly every beaten and unbeaten path there is to explore. What Americans and native English speakers tend to find normal is often left by the wayside as they acclimate, but one thing is for sure, the more that you can laugh at your mistakes and learn from them, the better off you’ll be in the long run. Check out how Jordan Gristock dealt with the initial challenges of the WorldTeach Chile program in 2012. —  One week of teaching down! Monday was extremely rough at the Liceo (high school). I arrived to the school…

Spirit Week in American Samoa

Posted by WTTech in American Samoa

For WorldTeach volunteers, school spirit is a source of inspiration. It manifests differently at every location, but no experience is quite the same without. Some gather over special foods, some have special ceremonies, and some simply dress up to show out. In American Samoa, it’s not uncommon to have a spirit week to celebrate the diversity of characters in the community. Let Danielle Randolph share with you how the spirit of Halloween takes places in her WorldTeach destination. If you’d like to read more about her experience, follow the link to her blog here – http://bit.ly/1NpCjGN. — Since my school doesn’t have any sports teams they tend to find to have a spirit week anyway. Halloween I guess is a perfect time…

“What an introduction to the world of teaching.”

Posted by WTTech in Chile

Have you ever heard that making a decision is just the beginning? Deciding to embark on a WorldTeach adventure is just the beginning and moreover just the tip of the iceberg. As you settle in and begin to peel back the layers on what you have decided to do, the adventure becomes as much about self-discovery as it does about teaching. The country will embrace you. The kids will admire you. The parents will appreciate you. But more than anything you’ll have to embrace, admire, and appreciate yourself to finish a WorldTeach adventure. Allow David Hanna to share with you his honest take on settling into the world of teaching in Chile. — I feel like I am connected to…

Why WorldTeach matters and a chance encounter….

Posted by WTTech in Marshall Islands

Frizz and Nolan at American University Hello WorldTeach supporters, normally our weekly blog is reserved for insight from our volunteers and their unique experiences from their communities around the world. The content on this blog has been accumulated over 6 years with more than 450 blog posts from the tropical rain forests of Ecuador to the deserts of Namibia. The pleasure I get from reading about our volunteers keeps me connected to them even from my office in Boston. This week, however, we’re taking a step back from the norm so I can share a little story with you from the Fall 2015 WorldTeach recruiting scene. I’m Nolan, our Director of Communications, and I oversee all of our advertising, partnerships,…

“I can’t believe I woke up this morning in Namibia!”

Posted by WTTech in Namibia

As WorldTeach remembers the life and service of Kristin Linnea Skvarla, we thought it timely to share with you why volunteer teaching in Namibia is more than a just great teaching opportunity – it’s a life-altering gift from those who taught before you. Thank you, Kristin. — ‘What is more beautiful than a ROAD?’ (George Sand, Consuelo, 1842) was one of the first entries Kristin penned into her journal during training in Windhoek, December, 1997. “I can’t believe I woke up this morning in Namibia!” As a WorldTeach volunteer at St. Boniface College in Namibia, Kristin lived in the remote rural village of Sambyu on the banks of the Okavango River. She taught geography, history, even math… her brother’s best subject, physical…

WorldTeach Colombia: A Day in the Life with Autumn

Posted by WTTech in Colombia

I often overlook that our blog reaches more than just a strict teacher demographic. For anyone out there who wants to know what it’s like to actually be a teacher, the following is a great example. Schedules and student rosters reflect one reality and yet the reality is that teaching is a fluid practice. Exceptional teachers know how to roll with the punches and push towards achievable goals. Let WorldTeach Volunteer Autumn Wonderlich share some insight about the life of a teacher in Cartagena, Colombia. — I work at Escuela Normal Superior de Cartagena de Indias in Nuevo Bosque, about a 20 minute walk from my apartment building.  The school is one of the higher-rated schools around, but is still…

“…give the kids in our class the best…,” she remembers.

Posted by WTTech in Colombia

Teachers know what we’re talking about. We plan for an hour and we only get 30 minutes. We plan for 30 minutes and your students are finished in 15. We plan, we plan, we plan, and always something doesn’t go according to plan. I recently read a definition of teachers that went something like this: “The occupation that makes all others possible.” Now if teachers are the root cause of all other occupations, why is that we struggle so much to plan? Probably because teachers are dutifully called to share with students how much of life is unplanned. In the face of the unknown and the uncertain, teachers like Jackey show up day after day to provide stability in the…

“I found meditation without crossing my legs and closing my eyes.”

Posted by WTTech in Costa Rica

The WorldTeach Costa Rica is a program unlike any other. Although famed for being an unparalleled tourist destination in Central America, Costa Rica is alive with other wonders for the heart and soul. It’s the deep sense of tranquility and understanding between students and volunteers that is normally so hard to explain – that same sense of inner peace that Erica Rawles seems to sum up so perfectly at the end of her summer journey with WorldTeach Costa Rica. — Never did I expect that coming to Alto Varas would help to heal me. In the middle of these rolling green hills and blue mountains, I found peace. I found the kind of calm that lets you sit on the…

“…Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.”

Posted by WTTech in Namibia

We’re all connected somehow. Whether by 6 degrees of separation, blood relation, or twitter, we’re all connected. And that’s the important part. Sometimes it take a whole lifetime to realize that, and sometimes it takes only a few moments of reflection after spending time with people half a world away from where you were born. No matter how you come to this realization, what you do with that awareness is pivotal. Keep in mind always, “…Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.” Thank you, Stephanie. —  TOTSIENS EN DANKIE MY VRIENDE  So, now I am back and have had the time to reflect on my African experience a bit. I think what this last year has taught me is…

Do you remember how much you like math?

Posted by WTTech in American Samoa

Danielle and company in front of the High School “After those two lessons I remembered how much I like math.” Sometimes, teaching is like getting a second chance at being a kid. As teachers, we get a sense of nervousness, a sense of challenge, and a sense of rising to the occasion. Sometimes, teachers feel like they’re being talked about in the back of the class, but they can’t let it distract them. Sometimes, teachers are asked questions they’re not prepared for, but they can’t call it quits. And sometimes, teachers get the unique opportunity to relearn critical skills, and they’re better for it. Always, teaching puts you in touch with how you became a teacher and instills in you…