WorldTeach

 

Returning “Home”

Posted by WTTech in Uncategorized

by: Shierly Mondianti “And so, I will cry a thousand tears and tuck my new home into a corner of my heart as I board that plane and fly once more. Pura Vida.” – Chandra Rapley, WT Costa Rica ‘14   At WorldTeach we talk a lot about traveling abroad and sending people on global adventures. But, one of the hardest things to read about and experience is the process of coming back “home.”   I have been reading a lot of our alums’ blogs here in the office lately, and as someone who is always traveling I can empathize with the mixed feelings that our volunteers experience—of heartbreak for not wanting to leave but also of excitement to return to friends…

Meinseng Mwahu! (Good Morning!): A Day in the Life (Pohnpei, Micronesia)

Posted by WTTech in Micronesia

This week, we are featuring one of our current volunteers, Laura Tracy, who is serving in Kolonia, Pohnpei. Read on to find out how Laura spends her day in this Micronesia Island: 6:50am Alarm goes off (meinseng mwahu; good morning!) 7:15am Laura actually gets out of bed 7:17am Jump in the freezing cold shower (but feeling good since you woke up sweating already!) 7:30am Breakfast time! Heat up coffee, scramble up some eggs, eat a local carat (Cah-Rah-ch) banana 8:00am Get dressed in local skirt, throw hair up in a bun and head out on the 10 minute walk to PICS 8:30am Morning bell (aka old oxygen diving tank) is rung to signal start of homeroom. I’m already sweating profusely from my walk to school, better get used to it! 8:50am-12:30pm I…

Good Grades vs. Good People: Teaching in American Samoa

Posted by WTTech in American Samoa

by: Shierly Mondianti One of the most important skills that a successful teacher needs is the ability to navigate the classroom.   In a wonderful TedTalk by one of our Alums, Jessica Baker (American Samoa ’13) talks about the need for mutual respect between teachers and students. She speaks to how there is “more to life than an A+…than numbers,” and reflects on the need to take a step back from traditional methods of teaching and measuring educational success.  As Jessica soon finds out, the process of learning does not have to be mechanical or straightforward. Sometimes, the student’s unconventional means of understanding is one of the most beautiful, powerful and fulfilling experiences.   We reached out to Jessica to find out…

Serving to Learn and Learning to Serve in American Samoa

Posted by WTTech in American Samoa

WorldTeach American Samoa volunteer Bryan Williams is both a teacher and a National Honor Society adviser.    “You can study government and politics in school, but the best way to really understand the process is to volunteer your time.” – Rob McKenna Last week my National Honor Society (NHS) students went on their first community volunteer trip of the year. The group decided to go to Fitiuta Elementary school and help the clean their campus. We arrived just before noon and the principal said they did not need to work until 1 so they could just hang out in the computer lab and get on the internet. I said “no thank you, we are here to work.” So my students, while…

Decisions, Decisions

Posted by WTTech in China

WorldTeach China Volunteer Katie contemplates a big decision she has ahead. “Jump or stay in the boat.” ― Margaret Stohl, Beautiful Darkness   I wanted to wake-up early today to go sit in the front yard and watch the sunrise and work on this next piece now that I have free time and my classes are over for the semester. That did not come even close to happening. I spent a good half of the day chilling with this bizarre chicken head pillow that class 8 gave me for New Years that I love.   I wasn’t sure what to do for this month’s post. So many things happened it felt like a big “whirlwind” of teaching and Netflixing in bed day…

Down to the Final Month

Posted by WTTech in American Samoa

Bryan Williams on his last month as a WorldTeach volunteer in American Samoa: Things are starting to feel a bit different here in Manu’a. The anticipation of graduation for my seniors is a coming to a head. They can sense that they are about to be freed from the confines of compulsory education. For some of them this means a desperate attempt to raise their grades so they can walk with their classmates at graduation. For others this means time to put it in cruise control. The ones on cruise control are very different in their post-graduation plans. Some students are planning on heading to Tutuila and get a job, some go to American Samoa Community College, and many of…

A Taste of Cartagena… ¡Que Sabrosa!

Posted by WTTech in Colombia

WorldTeach volunteer Rebecca gives us a taste of Colombian cooking. The first topic that I’ve been wanting to post about is all the food here. I came here expecting that I wouldn’t like the food and that maybe I’d even lose some weight….boy was I wrong. Cartagena knows how to eat well! There are foods here that I wouldn’t imagine I would enjoy and foods here that I wouldn’t even imagine existed. I am going to attempt to post about some of the delicious foods that I’ve tried here in all of their cultural uniqueness. First up: Arepa de Huevo. A wonderfully fried arepa (a corn based..something…) with an egg inside. Put some sauces on it and its even more…

Micheladas y Parrilladas

Posted by WTTech in Ecuador

One of our Ecuador volunteers recounts the mid-service conference, which allows volunteers to reflect on living and teaching in Ecuador thus far and to travel. “You get a strange feeling when you’re about to leave a place, like you’ll not only miss the people you love but you’ll miss the person you are now at this time and this place, because you’ll never be this way ever again.” – Azar Nafi As I’m nearing the end of my service in Ecuador, I wish I could freeze time! It will be hard to leave Ecuador. Lindo Mindo The Riobamba crew was the first to arrive in Quito. Rose, Emily and I headed to Republica del Cacao to get our hot chocolate fix. We…

‘Mahlia goe’ from Kapinga Village

Posted by WTTech in Micronesia

WorldTeach Micronesia volunteer Laura Tracy describes a traditional Kapingese celebration:   Kapingamarangi; an outer atoll of Pohnpei located about 740km south of the island, population less than 500, Polynesian heritage   Kapinga (Pohnrakiet) Village; a small village on Pohnpei where many immigrants from Kapingamarangi atoll live while on island, also shared with the people from Nukuoro atoll   March 15th; a day of celebration similar to Thanksgiving in the Kapingamarangi culture   “Mahlia goe” (MAH-lee-ah-koi); greeting in the Kapingamarangi language   A few weeks ago, I had the joy of experiencing a very unique cultural celebration here on Pohnpei. I have many students that are from islands other than Pohnpei, coming from places like Palau, Chuuk, Kosrae, and even smaller islands…

An Open Letter to Potential WorldTeach Summer Program Volunteers

Posted by WTTech in Namibia

WorldTeach summer alum, Gary Aitken shares some wisdom about teaching and living in a summer program. I am a 65 year old guy who spent the summer of 2014 in Namibia in the WorldTeach summer   program. It is one of the best things I ever did. I am writing this to   convince you to brave the unknown, overcome your fears, and go ahead and   Some compelling reasons:   1. It is one of the few things you will genuinely regret not doing when you are   lying on your death bed. I mean that literally, and seriously. Think about that   as you go to sleep tonight. What truly better way do you have to spend your…